Traveling To

Peru: Health Guide

Storied rituals and ancient ruins. Get lost in the remote intricacies of the Amazon. Use this guide as your travel wellness advisor to stay healthy in Peru.

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Travel Vaccines and Health Tips for Traveling to Peru

Peru does not require any vaccines to enter if you’re traveling directly from the US.

This might change if your itinerary includes a visit to or a 12+ hour layover in another country before you make it to Peru.

Always recommended:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria – Tetanus – Pertussis
  • Flu (Influenza)
  • Measles – Mumps – Rubella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Covid-19

Excluding COVID-19, these vaccines are all recommended during childhood. If you received them as a child, you are all set.

Conditionally recommended:

    • Yellow Fever – Recommended for all travelers over 9 months old visiting areas at elevations below 7600 ft in the regions of Amazonas, Loreto, Madre de Dios, San Martin and Ucayali, Puno, Cusco, Junín, Pasco, Huánuco, the far north of Apurimac, far northern Huancavelica, far northeastern Ancash, eastern La Libertad, northern and eastern Cajamarca, northern and northeastern Ayacucho, and eastern Piura. Learn more. 
    • Typhoid – Recommended for most visitors traveling to Peru, especially those visiting rural or remote areas or enjoying an extended stay. Learn more.
    • Rabies – Recommended if you are planning activities that may involve contact with domestic animals or wildlife (e.g. camping, farm visits). Learn more.

Adventure-filled and explorer ready, Peru is ripe for travel. Runway is here to prevent sickness from ruining your plans. We can prescribe these trip-saving medications in minutes:

Malaria Medication

is recommended if you are traveling to areas below 6600 ft and the Amazon region, including Manu National Park, Tambopata National Reserve, Pacaya Samiria, Iquitos, Puerto Maldonado, and the remote eastern regions of La Libertad and Lambayeque. The highland tourist areas (Cuzco, Machu Picchu, and Lake Titicaca), Lima Province, Arequipa, Ica, Moquegua, Nazca, Puno, and Tacna are considered risk-free and do not require Malaria medication.

Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics

help alleviate an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Traveler’s Diarrhea is common, so it’s a good idea to have medication on hand just in case.

Altitude Sickness Medication

is recommended if you plan to visit places at high elevations, including Machu Picchu, Cusco, Inca Trail, Puno, Lake Titicaca, Ollantaytambo, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, Juliaca, Huancavelica, Colca Valley, Huancayo, Huaraz, Kuelap, Ayacucho, and Cajamarca. Altitude sickness is commonly experienced among people visiting the traditional highlights of Peru.

Motion Sickness Medication

is recommended to keep nausea and dizziness at bay if you are susceptible to queasiness during road trips, train rides, boat cruises, or long excursions.

Add medication to your treatment plan in the section below.

(Required to enter country)

Medical Entry Requirements For Peru

Peru does not require any vaccines to enter if you’re traveling directly from the US.

This might change if your itinerary includes a visit to or a 12+ hour layover in another country before you make it to Peru.

Recommended Medications For Peru

Adventure-filled and explorer ready, Peru is ripe for travel. Runway is here to prevent sickness from ruining your plans. We can prescribe these trip-saving medications in minutes:

Malaria Medication

is recommended if you are traveling to areas below 6600 ft and the Amazon region, including Manu National Park, Tambopata National Reserve, Pacaya Samiria, Iquitos, Puerto Maldonado, and the remote eastern regions of La Libertad and Lambayeque. The highland tourist areas (Cuzco, Machu Picchu, and Lake Titicaca), Lima Province, Arequipa, Ica, Moquegua, Nazca, Puno, and Tacna are considered risk-free and do not require Malaria medication.

Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics

help alleviate an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Traveler’s Diarrhea is common, so it’s a good idea to have medication on hand just in case.

Altitude Sickness Medication

is recommended if you plan to visit places at high elevations, including Machu Picchu, Cusco, Inca Trail, Puno, Lake Titicaca, Ollantaytambo, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, Juliaca, Huancavelica, Colca Valley, Huancayo, Huaraz, Kuelap, Ayacucho, and Cajamarca. Altitude sickness is commonly experienced among people visiting the traditional highlights of Peru.

Motion Sickness Medication

is recommended to keep nausea and dizziness at bay if you are susceptible to queasiness during road trips, train rides, boat cruises, or long excursions.

Add medication to your treatment plan in the section below.

Recommended Vaccines For Travel To Peru

Always recommended:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria – Tetanus – Pertussis
  • Flu (Influenza)
  • Measles – Mumps – Rubella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • Covid-19

Excluding COVID-19, these vaccines are all recommended during childhood. If you received them as a child, you are all set.

Conditionally recommended:

    • Yellow Fever – Recommended for all travelers over 9 months old visiting areas at elevations below 7600 ft in the regions of Amazonas, Loreto, Madre de Dios, San Martin and Ucayali, Puno, Cusco, Junín, Pasco, Huánuco, the far north of Apurimac, far northern Huancavelica, far northeastern Ancash, eastern La Libertad, northern and eastern Cajamarca, northern and northeastern Ayacucho, and eastern Piura. Learn more. 
    • Typhoid – Recommended for most visitors traveling to Peru, especially those visiting rural or remote areas or enjoying an extended stay. Learn more.
    • Rabies – Recommended if you are planning activities that may involve contact with domestic animals or wildlife (e.g. camping, farm visits). Learn more.

Medical Entry Requirements

Medications To Bring

Buying Medications In Peru

Vaccinations For Peru

Healthcare In Peru

How To Avoid Illness In Peru

Vaccinations For Peru

Buying Medications In Peru

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Everything You Need To Know

From vaccination requirements to best health practices, all your Peru travel questions answered.

Peru does not currently have any medical entry requirements for those traveling from the US. 

When traveling to Peru, there are a few common health conditions to consider. By seamlessly prescribing the medication you need before you depart, Runway makes it easy to worry less and explore more while you’re away.

  • Malaria Medication: Malaria medication is not essential for the following areas: Lima Province; the cities of Arequipa, Ica, Moquegua, Nazca, Puno, and Tacna, the highland tourist areas (Cuzco, Machu Picchu, and Lake Titicaca), and along the Pacific Coast. Malaria medication is recommended for all other areas below 8200 ft, including the cities of Iquitos and Puerto Maldonado, and the remote eastern regions of La Libertad and Lambayeque. Runway can prescribe malaria medication, listed in the medication options above, to be taken during your trip. 
  • Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics: Traveler’s diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. It’s best to avoid non-bottled water as much as possible. We can prescribe anti-diarrhea antibiotics and recommend packing them in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort.  
  • Altitude Sickness Medication: Many cities and traveler destinations throughout Peru have high altitudes, including the Inca Trail, Machu Picchu, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, among others. The starting height for most cases of altitude sickness is 8000 ft above sea level. However, people who are more susceptible to altitude sickness can experience symptoms at elevations of 5000 ft and above. Commonly visited destinations above 8000 ft above sea level include Cusco, Inca Trail, Puno, Lake Titicaca, Ollantaytambo, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, Juliaca, Huancavelica, Colca Valley, Huancayo, Huaraz, Kuelap, Ayacucho, and Cajamarca. Machu Picchu is just under 8000 ft above sea level. Commonly visited destinations above 5,000 feet above sea level include Arequipa, Colca Canyon, Abancay, Chachapoyas, and Huanuco. Runway can prescribe altitude sickness medication, listed in the medication options above, to be brought with you as a preventative measure. We also provide chat support while you are traveling, should you have questions about your symptoms or when to take the medication. 
  • Motion Sickness Medication: No matter your means of travel across Peru, motion sickness can ruin the journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness patches or anti-nausea medication, listed in the medication options above, to alleviate queasiness during your trip and allow you to soak in the scenery.

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/peru/risk/malaria

Can I carry medicines on international flights?

Yes. You can carry pills or solid medications on international flights. If you have liquid medication that exceeds 3.4 ounces, you may be asked to pack it in your checked luggage versus being able to put it in your carry-on bag, so make sure to plan accordingly. 

Medications you procure in Peru may not always be manufactured in an FDA approved facility. Planning in advance with Runway means you don’t have to worry about accessing what you need while traveling.

Prior to traveling to Peru, it’s best to update your routine vaccinations if necessary, and take heed of the recommended vaccinations to prevent health issues and the spread of disease. 

What shots should I have when traveling to Peru?

There are no required vaccines for Peru for those traveling from the US, but we recommend considering the vaccines below based on your personal history and trip activities.

 

Recommended Vaccines for Traveling to Peru

The following is a list of the recommended vaccines for Peru that you likely received during childhood. If you received the following, you are ready to go:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Measles-Mumps-Rebella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B

 

Other Vaccine Considerations for Peru 

Here is a list of additional vaccines for preventable diseases that you may want to consider based on your Peru itinerary:

  • COVID-19: Recommended for all travelers headed to Peru.
  • Yellow Fever: Recommended for travelers headed to specific regions with elevations of <7600 ft (<2300 m), such as the Amazonas, Loreto, San Martin, Madre de Dios, Cusco, Puno, Junin, Huanuco, and specific areas in the regions of far north of Apurimac, far northeastern Ancash, far northern Huancavelica, eastern La Libertad, eastern Piura, northern and eastern Cajamarca, and northern and northeastern Ayacucho. Generally not recommended for travelers visiting Machu Picchu, Lima, Andes, and Cusco areas specifically, as well for travelers to areas west of the Andes, regions of Lambayeque and Tumbes, western Piura, and south, west, and central Cajamarca.
  • Typhoid: Recommended for travelers visiting rural or remote areas, enjoying an extended stay, or traveling extensively in the interior of Peru (e.g. hikers or trekkers). Travelers who use antacid therapy should also consider Typhoid vaccination. 
  • Rabies: Rabies vaccination is recommended for those working directly with wildlife, such as veterinarians, field biologists, and animal handlers. It is also recommended for anyone planning to camp, trek, explore caves, or visit farms or rural areas, since rabid dogs are common in Peru.

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/peru/risk/typhoid-fever

Should you need healthcare while you’re away, equip yourself beforehand with a list of local doctors and Peru medical care facilities near your destination. Carefully review your health care coverage and consider purchasing travel health insurance, as most standard plans don’t extend internationally. Fill all prescriptions prior to embarking on your travels to ensure you have enough with you for the duration of your trip plus a few extra days in case of delays.

How do I search for hospitals in Peru?

Often, accommodations in Peru will have hospital recommendations and information readily available. You can also search the Joint Commission International website to seek accredited facilities near the city where you’re staying, as well as seek resources from the U.S. Embassy. 

Source: https://pe.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/doctors/

What should I know about healthcare in Peru for tourists?

As with traveling anywhere internationally, it’s recommended to secure travel health insurance. Peru hospitals with English-speaking medical personnel and emergency services are more readily available near larger cities with high tourist areas. 

What is the average cost of hospital stay in Peru?

The fees for a hospital stay in Peru can widely vary. It’s best to confirm costs in advance to avoid unexpected expenses. Several factors will contribute to the total cost, such as emergency services, tests and x-rays, overnight visits vs. consultations. Keep in mind, most medical facilities in Peru will require a cash deposit prior to performing health services and require payment in full before being released.

There are several general precautions when traveling to Peru in order to avoid getting sick. Be aware of your surroundings, get vaccinated before traveling to areas with high risk for diseases like Malaria and Yellow Fever, and seek out established food and water sources. Additionally, if you are prone to altitude or motion sickness, carry the proper medication to prevent onset symptoms and preserve your health and enjoyment.

Are there common conditions I’m susceptible to when traveling to Peru?

Changes in time zones and climates can affect the body, but with proactive planning, you can stay healthy and safe. Here are a few common conditions that may occur on a trip to Peru:

 

  • Heat Exhaustion: Peru can reach high temperatures and even higher humidity in certain regions. Stay hydrated and keep the body cool by wearing loose, lightweight clothing. Since the combination of sun exposure and increased activity can quickly lead to a heat-related illness, make sure to eat plenty of salty snacks to replace salt lost through sweating. Salt pills and electrolyte-enhanced drinks (available in most pharmacies and convenience stores) may be helpful packing items to maintain balance in the body.
  • Hyperthermia: Along the coast and in the jungle of Peru, you’ll experience a warm temperate climate with high humidity. In the highlands, nights can get cold with frequent rain, particularly when visiting during the months of November-March. Even though temperatures may not reach as high as other destinations, dense humidity can cause hyperthermia (when the body overheats) and result in fatigue, muscle cramps, fainting, and other symptoms. It’s important to stay hydrated and be careful with overexertion of activity when exploring these areas.
  • Jet Lag: Jet lag is a common condition that sets in when traveling across several time zones in a short amount of time. This disruption to the body’s circadian rhythm often leads to sleeplessness, fatigue, and digestive issues, among other symptoms. It’s best to sync up your sleep-wake schedule to your current destination as soon as possible. Also, consider medication for sleeplessness as part of your treatment plan with Runway. The non-habit-forming antihistamine will help you sleep regardless of what time zone you’re in.

 

Here are a few other things to be mindful of as you plan your trip:

 

Avoid food and water contamination: Travelers often ask: Can I drink water in Peru? And the answer is to err on the side of safety and stick with sealed, bottled water. Don’t rely on tap water or use ice machines as your hydration source. As for what not to eat in Peru, wash fresh produce in tap water to avoid contamination. Avoid raw and unpasteurized foods as well. Unclean water is often the main culprit of Travelers’ Diarrhea and other Peru health issues, so practice safe, clean food and water habits when traveling.

Prevent Dengue and Zika: Increased numbers of Dengue, which comes from mosquito bites, have been reported for several parts of Central and South America. Zika, Chagas disease, and Leishmaniasis are also mosquito-carrying diseases to protect yourself from with repellents that have high percentages of active ingredients such as DEET, Picaridin, and lemon eucalyptus oil, which all offer longer protection. 

Stay safe while adventuring: Peru is a popular destination for outdoor adventures. To stay safe, stay alert with changing weather conditions and prepare for different landscapes that can lead to conditions like altitude sickness and heat exhaustion, as well as possible injury due to wet and slippery surfaces and extreme temperatures. Prior to embarking on any activities, make sure you’ve dressed appropriately in lightweight clothing and sturdy shoes, plus packed protective items, such as sunscreen, bug spray, basic first aid, and filled water bottles. 

Keep wild animals wild: While touching, petting, and feeding wild animals is exciting, remember that most wild animals are not comfortable interacting with humans or have been habituated into doing so for food. No matter if they are domestic pets or wild creatures, animal licks, bites, and scratches can lead to bacterial infections. Be aware of animals being used for financial gain and look into the animal welfare of any wildlife related activity. Protect these animals and yourself by keeping wild animals wild!

 

Feel good about your upcoming trip to Peru by preparing a treatment plan with Runway before your trip. You can avoid common travel ailments by bringing medication with you, allowing you to worry less and explore more.

Peru does not currently have any medical entry requirements for those traveling from the US. 

When traveling to Peru, there are a few common health conditions to consider. By seamlessly prescribing the medication you need before you depart, Runway makes it easy to worry less and explore more while you’re away.

  • Malaria Medication: Malaria medication is not essential for the following areas: Lima Province; the cities of Arequipa, Ica, Moquegua, Nazca, Puno, and Tacna, the highland tourist areas (Cuzco, Machu Picchu, and Lake Titicaca), and along the Pacific Coast. Malaria medication is recommended for all other areas below 8200 ft, including the cities of Iquitos and Puerto Maldonado, and the remote eastern regions of La Libertad and Lambayeque. Runway can prescribe malaria medication, listed in the medication options above, to be taken during your trip. 
  • Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics: Traveler’s diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. It’s best to avoid non-bottled water as much as possible. We can prescribe anti-diarrhea antibiotics and recommend packing them in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort.  
  • Altitude Sickness Medication: Many cities and traveler destinations throughout Peru have high altitudes, including the Inca Trail, Machu Picchu, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, among others. The starting height for most cases of altitude sickness is 8000 ft above sea level. However, people who are more susceptible to altitude sickness can experience symptoms at elevations of 5000 ft and above. Commonly visited destinations above 8000 ft above sea level include Cusco, Inca Trail, Puno, Lake Titicaca, Ollantaytambo, Nevado Huascaran, Cerro de Pasco, Juliaca, Huancavelica, Colca Valley, Huancayo, Huaraz, Kuelap, Ayacucho, and Cajamarca. Machu Picchu is just under 8000 ft above sea level. Commonly visited destinations above 5,000 feet above sea level include Arequipa, Colca Canyon, Abancay, Chachapoyas, and Huanuco. Runway can prescribe altitude sickness medication, listed in the medication options above, to be brought with you as a preventative measure. We also provide chat support while you are traveling, should you have questions about your symptoms or when to take the medication. 
  • Motion Sickness Medication: No matter your means of travel across Peru, motion sickness can ruin the journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness patches or anti-nausea medication, listed in the medication options above, to alleviate queasiness during your trip and allow you to soak in the scenery.

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/peru/risk/malaria

Can I carry medicines on international flights?

Yes. You can carry pills or solid medications on international flights. If you have liquid medication that exceeds 3.4 ounces, you may be asked to pack it in your checked luggage versus being able to put it in your carry-on bag, so make sure to plan accordingly. 

Medications you procure in Peru may not always be manufactured in an FDA approved facility. Planning in advance with Runway means you don’t have to worry about accessing what you need while traveling.

Prior to traveling to Peru, it’s best to update your routine vaccinations if necessary, and take heed of the recommended vaccinations to prevent health issues and the spread of disease. 

What shots should I have when traveling to Peru?

There are no required vaccines for Peru for those traveling from the US, but we recommend considering the vaccines below based on your personal history and trip activities.

 

Recommended Vaccines for Traveling to Peru

The following is a list of the recommended vaccines for Peru that you likely received during childhood. If you received the following, you are ready to go:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Measles-Mumps-Rebella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B

 

Other Vaccine Considerations for Peru 

Here is a list of additional vaccines for preventable diseases that you may want to consider based on your Peru itinerary:

  • COVID-19: Recommended for all travelers headed to Peru.
  • Yellow Fever: Recommended for travelers headed to specific regions with elevations of <7600 ft (<2300 m), such as the Amazonas, Loreto, San Martin, Madre de Dios, Cusco, Puno, Junin, Huanuco, and specific areas in the regions of far north of Apurimac, far northeastern Ancash, far northern Huancavelica, eastern La Libertad, eastern Piura, northern and eastern Cajamarca, and northern and northeastern Ayacucho. Generally not recommended for travelers visiting Machu Picchu, Lima, Andes, and Cusco areas specifically, as well for travelers to areas west of the Andes, regions of Lambayeque and Tumbes, western Piura, and south, west, and central Cajamarca.
  • Typhoid: Recommended for travelers visiting rural or remote areas, enjoying an extended stay, or traveling extensively in the interior of Peru (e.g. hikers or trekkers). Travelers who use antacid therapy should also consider Typhoid vaccination. 
  • Rabies: Rabies vaccination is recommended for those working directly with wildlife, such as veterinarians, field biologists, and animal handlers. It is also recommended for anyone planning to camp, trek, explore caves, or visit farms or rural areas, since rabid dogs are common in Peru.

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/peru/risk/typhoid-fever

Should you need healthcare while you’re away, equip yourself beforehand with a list of local doctors and Peru medical care facilities near your destination. Carefully review your health care coverage and consider purchasing travel health insurance, as most standard plans don’t extend internationally. Fill all prescriptions prior to embarking on your travels to ensure you have enough with you for the duration of your trip plus a few extra days in case of delays.

How do I search for hospitals in Peru?

Often, accommodations in Peru will have hospital recommendations and information readily available. You can also search the Joint Commission International website to seek accredited facilities near the city where you’re staying, as well as seek resources from the U.S. Embassy. 

Source: https://pe.usembassy.gov/u-s-citizen-services/doctors/

What should I know about healthcare in Peru for tourists?

As with traveling anywhere internationally, it’s recommended to secure travel health insurance. Peru hospitals with English-speaking medical personnel and emergency services are more readily available near larger cities with high tourist areas. 

What is the average cost of hospital stay in Peru?

The fees for a hospital stay in Peru can widely vary. It’s best to confirm costs in advance to avoid unexpected expenses. Several factors will contribute to the total cost, such as emergency services, tests and x-rays, overnight visits vs. consultations. Keep in mind, most medical facilities in Peru will require a cash deposit prior to performing health services and require payment in full before being released.

There are several general precautions when traveling to Peru in order to avoid getting sick. Be aware of your surroundings, get vaccinated before traveling to areas with high risk for diseases like Malaria and Yellow Fever, and seek out established food and water sources. Additionally, if you are prone to altitude or motion sickness, carry the proper medication to prevent onset symptoms and preserve your health and enjoyment.

Are there common conditions I’m susceptible to when traveling to Peru?

Changes in time zones and climates can affect the body, but with proactive planning, you can stay healthy and safe. Here are a few common conditions that may occur on a trip to Peru:

 

  • Heat Exhaustion: Peru can reach high temperatures and even higher humidity in certain regions. Stay hydrated and keep the body cool by wearing loose, lightweight clothing. Since the combination of sun exposure and increased activity can quickly lead to a heat-related illness, make sure to eat plenty of salty snacks to replace salt lost through sweating. Salt pills and electrolyte-enhanced drinks (available in most pharmacies and convenience stores) may be helpful packing items to maintain balance in the body.
  • Hyperthermia: Along the coast and in the jungle of Peru, you’ll experience a warm temperate climate with high humidity. In the highlands, nights can get cold with frequent rain, particularly when visiting during the months of November-March. Even though temperatures may not reach as high as other destinations, dense humidity can cause hyperthermia (when the body overheats) and result in fatigue, muscle cramps, fainting, and other symptoms. It’s important to stay hydrated and be careful with overexertion of activity when exploring these areas.
  • Jet Lag: Jet lag is a common condition that sets in when traveling across several time zones in a short amount of time. This disruption to the body’s circadian rhythm often leads to sleeplessness, fatigue, and digestive issues, among other symptoms. It’s best to sync up your sleep-wake schedule to your current destination as soon as possible. Also, consider medication for sleeplessness as part of your treatment plan with Runway. The non-habit-forming antihistamine will help you sleep regardless of what time zone you’re in.

 

Here are a few other things to be mindful of as you plan your trip:

 

Avoid food and water contamination: Travelers often ask: Can I drink water in Peru? And the answer is to err on the side of safety and stick with sealed, bottled water. Don’t rely on tap water or use ice machines as your hydration source. As for what not to eat in Peru, wash fresh produce in tap water to avoid contamination. Avoid raw and unpasteurized foods as well. Unclean water is often the main culprit of Travelers’ Diarrhea and other Peru health issues, so practice safe, clean food and water habits when traveling.

Prevent Dengue and Zika: Increased numbers of Dengue, which comes from mosquito bites, have been reported for several parts of Central and South America. Zika, Chagas disease, and Leishmaniasis are also mosquito-carrying diseases to protect yourself from with repellents that have high percentages of active ingredients such as DEET, Picaridin, and lemon eucalyptus oil, which all offer longer protection. 

Stay safe while adventuring: Peru is a popular destination for outdoor adventures. To stay safe, stay alert with changing weather conditions and prepare for different landscapes that can lead to conditions like altitude sickness and heat exhaustion, as well as possible injury due to wet and slippery surfaces and extreme temperatures. Prior to embarking on any activities, make sure you’ve dressed appropriately in lightweight clothing and sturdy shoes, plus packed protective items, such as sunscreen, bug spray, basic first aid, and filled water bottles. 

Keep wild animals wild: While touching, petting, and feeding wild animals is exciting, remember that most wild animals are not comfortable interacting with humans or have been habituated into doing so for food. No matter if they are domestic pets or wild creatures, animal licks, bites, and scratches can lead to bacterial infections. Be aware of animals being used for financial gain and look into the animal welfare of any wildlife related activity. Protect these animals and yourself by keeping wild animals wild!

 

Feel good about your upcoming trip to Peru by preparing a treatment plan with Runway before your trip. You can avoid common travel ailments by bringing medication with you, allowing you to worry less and explore more.

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    Runway offers travelers like you, the medications you may need before you go.