Traveling To

Mexico: Health Guide

Filled with flavor from the bustling cities to the windswept beaches. Make the most of Mexico with this travel health guide to keep you roaming.

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

(Screen shot now, thank us later)

Travel Vaccines and Health Tips for Traveling to Mexico

Currently, Mexico does not require any vaccines for travelers. Keep in mind, though, requirements can change, so always check for updates prior to hitting the Runway.

Always recommended:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria – Tetanus – Pertussis
  • Measles – Mumps – Rubella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • COVID-19

Excluding COVID-19, these vaccines are all recommended during childhood. If you received them as a child, you are all set.

Conditionally recommended:

    • Typhoid – Recommended if you are visiting rural or remote areas or enjoying an extended stay. Learn more.
    • Rabies – Recommended if you are planning activities that may involve contact with domestic animals or wildlife (e.g. camping, farm visits). Learn more.

Being prepared prior to your trip can help provide peace of mind throughout your travels. When visiting Mexico, most will take or travel with the following medications:

Malaria Medication

If you are visiting Chiapas and the southern part of Chihuahua which have a higher risk of transmission, Malaria medication is recommended. Malaria infection can also happen in Campeche, Durango, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Sonora, and Tabasco but the risk is low and Malaria medication is not essential.

Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics

Traveler's diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water and is common throughout most developing countries, including Mexico. Runway can prescribe antibiotics for traveler’s diarrhea to pack with you in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort.

Altitude Sickness Medication

If you are prone to altitude sickness and plan to visit places at or above 5000 ft – like Mexico City, Puebla, and San Miguel de Allende – altitude sickness medication is suggested. Altitude sickness presents as headaches, dizziness, and dehydration and is most common when visiting locations higher than 8000 ft above sea level although people who are more susceptible can experience symptoms at 5000 feet and above.

Motion Sickness Medication

Whether cruising by boat or traveling by car, motion sickness can ruin the journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness medication to alleviate queasiness and allow you to soak in the scenery.

Add medication to your treatment plan in the section below.

(Required to enter country)

Medical Entry Requirements For Mexico

Currently, Mexico does not require any vaccines for travelers. Keep in mind, though, requirements can change, so always check for updates prior to hitting the Runway.

Recommended Medications For Mexico

Being prepared prior to your trip can help provide peace of mind throughout your travels. When visiting Mexico, most will take or travel with the following medications:

Malaria Medication

If you are visiting Chiapas and the southern part of Chihuahua which have a higher risk of transmission, Malaria medication is recommended. Malaria infection can also happen in Campeche, Durango, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Sonora, and Tabasco but the risk is low and Malaria medication is not essential.

Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics

Traveler's diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water and is common throughout most developing countries, including Mexico. Runway can prescribe antibiotics for traveler’s diarrhea to pack with you in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort.

Altitude Sickness Medication

If you are prone to altitude sickness and plan to visit places at or above 5000 ft – like Mexico City, Puebla, and San Miguel de Allende – altitude sickness medication is suggested. Altitude sickness presents as headaches, dizziness, and dehydration and is most common when visiting locations higher than 8000 ft above sea level although people who are more susceptible can experience symptoms at 5000 feet and above.

Motion Sickness Medication

Whether cruising by boat or traveling by car, motion sickness can ruin the journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness medication to alleviate queasiness and allow you to soak in the scenery.

Add medication to your treatment plan in the section below.

Recommended Vaccines For Mexico

Always recommended:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria – Tetanus – Pertussis
  • Measles – Mumps – Rubella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B
  • COVID-19

Excluding COVID-19, these vaccines are all recommended during childhood. If you received them as a child, you are all set.

Conditionally recommended:

    • Typhoid – Recommended if you are visiting rural or remote areas or enjoying an extended stay. Learn more.
    • Rabies – Recommended if you are planning activities that may involve contact with domestic animals or wildlife (e.g. camping, farm visits). Learn more.

Medical Entry Requirements

Medications To Bring

Buying Medications In Mexico

Vaccinations For Mexico

Healthcare In Mexico

How To Avoid Illness In Mexico

Vaccinations For Mexico

Buying Medications In Mexico

Explore More

Build Your Plan

Everything You Need To Know

From vaccination requirements to best health practices, all your Mexico travel questions answered.

Mexico does not have any medical entry requirements for US travelers.  

Being prepared prior to your trip can help provide peace of mind throughout your travels. When visiting Mexico, most will take or travel with the following medications:

 

  • Malaria Medication: Though Malaria medication is not necessary for most travels to Mexico, it is recommended for travelers visiting Chiapas and the southern part of Chihuahua. Malaria transmission also occurs in Campeche, Durango, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Sonora, and Tabasco but the risk to travelers is low. If you plan to visit any of these areas, Runway can prescribe Malaria medication, listed in the medication options above, for your trip. 
  • Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics: Traveler’s diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Traveler’s diarrhea is common, affecting 30% to 70% of travelers. It’s best to avoid non-bottled water or ask your accommodation choice about their water filtration practices. Runway can prescribe anti-diarrhea antibiotics, listed in the medication options above, to pack with you in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort. 
  • Altitude Sickness Medication: The starting height for most cases of altitude sickness is 8,000 feet above sea level. However, people who are more susceptible to altitude sickness can experience symptoms at elevations of 5000 feet and above. Mexico City and Puebla both sit at over 7000 feet above sea level and San Miguel de Allende sits above 6000 feet. Runway can prescribe altitude sickness medication to help you adjust to altitude changes so you can continue with your adventures.
  • Motion Sickness Medication: Many travelers visiting Mexico choose to cruise, road trip, or travel by boat to soak in the scenery. Motion sickness can ruin any journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness patches or anti-nausea medication, listed in the medication options above, to alleviate queasiness during your trip.

 

https://www.iamat.org/country/mexico/risk/malaria

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/preparing-international-travelers/travelers-diarrhea

 

Can I carry medicines on international flights?

 

Medications in pill or solid form are allowed on international flights. There is no limit to these amounts, and it’s recommended to keep any prescriptions with you in your carry-on bag in case you need immediate access. For liquid medication, follow the standard liquid requirements for carry-on suitcases and bags just in case; otherwise, pack securely in your checked luggage.

Medications you procure in Mexico may not always be manufactured in an FDA approved facility. It’s always smart to be prepared prior to embarking on any trip. With Runway, you can get the medication you need (or might need) beforehand so you can avoid having to find it while you’re in Mexico. 

Though there are no required vaccinations for travelers from the US, there are several recommended vaccines. When planning your trip, make sure your vaccinations are up-to-date and documented.

 

What vaccines should I have when traveling to Mexico?

 

Below are recommended vaccines that you might need based on your personal history and trip activities.

 

Recommended Vaccines for Traveling to Mexico

The following includes the standard childhood vaccines administered in the US. If you received vaccines as a child, you are likely up to date on:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Measles-Mumps-Rebella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B

 

Other Vaccine Considerations for Travel To Mexico

Here is a list of additional vaccines that you may want to consider based on your itinerary:

 

  • COVID-19: Recommended for all travelers headed to Ecuador.
  • Rabies: Recommended for travelers who plan on camping, cave exploring, and enjoying other outdoor adventures, as well as those who may have contact with animals. Travelers with plans to visit rural areas should also consider the rabies vaccine as rabid dogs are common.
  • Typhoid: Recommended for travelers visiting rural areas, enjoying an extended stay, or hiking/trekking across Mexico. Additionally, this vaccination is recommended for travelers regularly using antacid therapy

 

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/mexico/risk/typhoid-fever

There may be instances where you require healthcare while in Mexico. Being prepared ahead of time with resources and information can help alleviate the additional stress of locating medical help when you need it most.

 

How do I search for hospitals in Mexico?

 

Research hospitals near the areas you’ll be visiting while in Mexico and record them in your phone or write them down on a list to take with you. Additionally, check the website of the hotel you’re staying at or speak with the concierge or host of your accommodations to receive local hospital recommendations for care.

 

What should I know about healthcare in Mexico for tourists?

 

It’s recommended to consider travel health insurance prior to visiting Mexico as some providers require prepayment, even in an emergency, before treating patients without insurance. Though medical services are often less expensive than in the US, standard healthcare coverage does not extend to while traveling internationally. Additionally, document all medical care and medications received abroad to report to your primary care physician once you return home.

 

What is the average cost of hospital stay in Mexico?

 

According to the IMSS, Mexico’s public healthcare system, the average cost of a hospital stay is approximately $400. Often, a visit to the doctor for a consultation is closer to $20-$25. However, these prices vary depending on the type of illness or injury, required tests and/or x-rays, and other factors involving the medical visit, including the hospital itself. 

 

Source: http://qroo.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/2019-cuotas-imss.pdf

 

Are hospitals in Mexico safe?

 

Typically speaking, hospitals in Mexico have comparable quality of health services and facilities as those in the US. However, it’s helpful to perform research prior to traveling to review certifications, contact and pricing information, as well as the credentials and reputation of this hospital. Fortunately, most medical staff near metro areas in Mexico are English-speaking doctors and have training equivalent to that required in the US.

Prevention is key. Reference our list of common ailments below and avoid preventable conditions that can derail your adventures by taking precautions. Preparing for your trip with prescription medication from Runway can help keep symptoms at bay. 

 

Are there common conditions I’m susceptible to when traveling to Mexico?

 

In addition to vaccine-preventable illnesses to be aware of, common health issues in Mexico include:

 

  • Heat Exhaustion: Mexico can get quite hot in certain areas and seasons, which can quickly lead to heat exhaustion. Stay hydrated and invest in a sun hat and lightweight, loose clothing for extra coverage. Overheating can also lead to salt insufficiency since your body excretes the salt it requires while you sweat. This can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, and muscular cramps. You may want to buy salt pills and electrolyte-enhanced drinks, available at local pharmacies, to stay hydrated and replenished during your travels

 

  • Heatstroke: It’s easy to spend too much time in the sun in Mexico, but without proper hydration, you may develop heatstroke. The extreme heat and lack of fluids can cause your body’s natural heating and cooling mechanism to fail, causing your body temperature to increase to hazardous levels. Severe headaches, no sweating, dizziness, vomiting, and/or nausea are the most common symptoms. If this does occur, hospitalization will be required. If you feel symptoms coming on, get out of the sun, cool down with a damp towel or sheet, and hydrate.

 

Other healthy travel tips for Mexico:

 

Avoid contaminated water: A common travel question is, “can I drink the water in Mexico?” The answer is simple. Play it safe. Err on the safe side and rely only on filtered water that’s been sealed (bottled water is best). Skip tap water and refrain from adding ice to drinks as both can be contaminated. Coming into contact with contaminated water, whether through touch or consumption, can lead to Leptospirosis, a disease caused by bacteria that can lead to symptoms of fever, chills, headache, vomiting, or more commonly traveler’s diarrhea. If this occurs, though rarely life-threatening, it is unpleasant and can last anywhere from three to seven days.

 

Avoid bug bites: There are several diseases transferred via bug bites, such as Zika, Dengue, and Leishmaniasis. To protect yourself when in Mexico, opt for wearing lightweight, long-sleeves and pants, and hats. Use insect repellent that includes high percentages of active ingredients such as DEET, Picaridin, and lemon eucalyptus oil. Also, avoid sleeping outdoors. Stay in air-conditioned, screened areas, when possible, or use a bed net when not sleeping in an enclosed space.

 

Avoid raw and unpasteurized foods: Be cognizant about areas with unpasteurized products and live or raw wild game. Avoid eating or coming into contact with raw meats, fish, and eggs, as well as unwashed, raw fruits and vegetables. Additionally, avoid visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets to prevent the contraction and spread of bird flu

 

Keep wild animals wild: While touching, petting, and feeding wild animals is exciting, remember that most wild animals are not comfortable interacting with humans or have been habituated into doing so for food. No matter if they are domestic pets or wild creatures, animal licks, bites, and scratches can lead to bacterial infections. Be aware of animals being used for financial gain and look into the animal welfare of any wildlife related activity. Protect these animals and yourself by keeping wild animals wild!

 

With proper preventative planning, you can count on an enjoyable trip. Create a Runway treatment plan to stay healthy as you explore.

Mexico does not have any medical entry requirements for US travelers.  

Being prepared prior to your trip can help provide peace of mind throughout your travels. When visiting Mexico, most will take or travel with the following medications:

 

  • Malaria Medication: Though Malaria medication is not necessary for most travels to Mexico, it is recommended for travelers visiting Chiapas and the southern part of Chihuahua. Malaria transmission also occurs in Campeche, Durango, Nayarit, Quintana Roo, Sonora, and Tabasco but the risk to travelers is low. If you plan to visit any of these areas, Runway can prescribe Malaria medication, listed in the medication options above, for your trip. 
  • Traveler’s Diarrhea Antibiotics: Traveler’s diarrhea is an intestinal infection that occurs as a result of eating or drinking contaminated food or water. Traveler’s diarrhea is common, affecting 30% to 70% of travelers. It’s best to avoid non-bottled water or ask your accommodation choice about their water filtration practices. Runway can prescribe anti-diarrhea antibiotics, listed in the medication options above, to pack with you in case you find yourself experiencing discomfort. 
  • Altitude Sickness Medication: The starting height for most cases of altitude sickness is 8,000 feet above sea level. However, people who are more susceptible to altitude sickness can experience symptoms at elevations of 5000 feet and above. Mexico City and Puebla both sit at over 7000 feet above sea level and San Miguel de Allende sits above 6000 feet. Runway can prescribe altitude sickness medication to help you adjust to altitude changes so you can continue with your adventures.
  • Motion Sickness Medication: Many travelers visiting Mexico choose to cruise, road trip, or travel by boat to soak in the scenery. Motion sickness can ruin any journey with dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. Runway can prescribe motion sickness patches or anti-nausea medication, listed in the medication options above, to alleviate queasiness during your trip.

 

https://www.iamat.org/country/mexico/risk/malaria

https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/yellowbook/2020/preparing-international-travelers/travelers-diarrhea

 

Can I carry medicines on international flights?

 

Medications in pill or solid form are allowed on international flights. There is no limit to these amounts, and it’s recommended to keep any prescriptions with you in your carry-on bag in case you need immediate access. For liquid medication, follow the standard liquid requirements for carry-on suitcases and bags just in case; otherwise, pack securely in your checked luggage.

Medications you procure in Mexico may not always be manufactured in an FDA approved facility. It’s always smart to be prepared prior to embarking on any trip. With Runway, you can get the medication you need (or might need) beforehand so you can avoid having to find it while you’re in Mexico. 

Though there are no required vaccinations for travelers from the US, there are several recommended vaccines. When planning your trip, make sure your vaccinations are up-to-date and documented.

 

What vaccines should I have when traveling to Mexico?

 

Below are recommended vaccines that you might need based on your personal history and trip activities.

 

Recommended Vaccines for Traveling to Mexico

The following includes the standard childhood vaccines administered in the US. If you received vaccines as a child, you are likely up to date on:

  • Chickenpox
  • Diphtheria-Tetanus-Pertussis
  • Measles-Mumps-Rebella (MMR)
  • Polio
  • Shingles
  • Hepatitis A
  • Hepatitis B

 

Other Vaccine Considerations for Travel To Mexico

Here is a list of additional vaccines that you may want to consider based on your itinerary:

 

  • COVID-19: Recommended for all travelers headed to Ecuador.
  • Rabies: Recommended for travelers who plan on camping, cave exploring, and enjoying other outdoor adventures, as well as those who may have contact with animals. Travelers with plans to visit rural areas should also consider the rabies vaccine as rabid dogs are common.
  • Typhoid: Recommended for travelers visiting rural areas, enjoying an extended stay, or hiking/trekking across Mexico. Additionally, this vaccination is recommended for travelers regularly using antacid therapy

 

Source: https://www.iamat.org/country/mexico/risk/typhoid-fever

There may be instances where you require healthcare while in Mexico. Being prepared ahead of time with resources and information can help alleviate the additional stress of locating medical help when you need it most.

 

How do I search for hospitals in Mexico?

 

Research hospitals near the areas you’ll be visiting while in Mexico and record them in your phone or write them down on a list to take with you. Additionally, check the website of the hotel you’re staying at or speak with the concierge or host of your accommodations to receive local hospital recommendations for care.

 

What should I know about healthcare in Mexico for tourists?

 

It’s recommended to consider travel health insurance prior to visiting Mexico as some providers require prepayment, even in an emergency, before treating patients without insurance. Though medical services are often less expensive than in the US, standard healthcare coverage does not extend to while traveling internationally. Additionally, document all medical care and medications received abroad to report to your primary care physician once you return home.

 

What is the average cost of hospital stay in Mexico?

 

According to the IMSS, Mexico’s public healthcare system, the average cost of a hospital stay is approximately $400. Often, a visit to the doctor for a consultation is closer to $20-$25. However, these prices vary depending on the type of illness or injury, required tests and/or x-rays, and other factors involving the medical visit, including the hospital itself. 

 

Source: http://qroo.us/wp-content/uploads/2019/05/2019-cuotas-imss.pdf

 

Are hospitals in Mexico safe?

 

Typically speaking, hospitals in Mexico have comparable quality of health services and facilities as those in the US. However, it’s helpful to perform research prior to traveling to review certifications, contact and pricing information, as well as the credentials and reputation of this hospital. Fortunately, most medical staff near metro areas in Mexico are English-speaking doctors and have training equivalent to that required in the US.

Prevention is key. Reference our list of common ailments below and avoid preventable conditions that can derail your adventures by taking precautions. Preparing for your trip with prescription medication from Runway can help keep symptoms at bay. 

 

Are there common conditions I’m susceptible to when traveling to Mexico?

 

In addition to vaccine-preventable illnesses to be aware of, common health issues in Mexico include:

 

  • Heat Exhaustion: Mexico can get quite hot in certain areas and seasons, which can quickly lead to heat exhaustion. Stay hydrated and invest in a sun hat and lightweight, loose clothing for extra coverage. Overheating can also lead to salt insufficiency since your body excretes the salt it requires while you sweat. This can lead to symptoms such as fatigue, headaches, and muscular cramps. You may want to buy salt pills and electrolyte-enhanced drinks, available at local pharmacies, to stay hydrated and replenished during your travels

 

  • Heatstroke: It’s easy to spend too much time in the sun in Mexico, but without proper hydration, you may develop heatstroke. The extreme heat and lack of fluids can cause your body’s natural heating and cooling mechanism to fail, causing your body temperature to increase to hazardous levels. Severe headaches, no sweating, dizziness, vomiting, and/or nausea are the most common symptoms. If this does occur, hospitalization will be required. If you feel symptoms coming on, get out of the sun, cool down with a damp towel or sheet, and hydrate.

 

Other healthy travel tips for Mexico:

 

Avoid contaminated water: A common travel question is, “can I drink the water in Mexico?” The answer is simple. Play it safe. Err on the safe side and rely only on filtered water that’s been sealed (bottled water is best). Skip tap water and refrain from adding ice to drinks as both can be contaminated. Coming into contact with contaminated water, whether through touch or consumption, can lead to Leptospirosis, a disease caused by bacteria that can lead to symptoms of fever, chills, headache, vomiting, or more commonly traveler’s diarrhea. If this occurs, though rarely life-threatening, it is unpleasant and can last anywhere from three to seven days.

 

Avoid bug bites: There are several diseases transferred via bug bites, such as Zika, Dengue, and Leishmaniasis. To protect yourself when in Mexico, opt for wearing lightweight, long-sleeves and pants, and hats. Use insect repellent that includes high percentages of active ingredients such as DEET, Picaridin, and lemon eucalyptus oil. Also, avoid sleeping outdoors. Stay in air-conditioned, screened areas, when possible, or use a bed net when not sleeping in an enclosed space.

 

Avoid raw and unpasteurized foods: Be cognizant about areas with unpasteurized products and live or raw wild game. Avoid eating or coming into contact with raw meats, fish, and eggs, as well as unwashed, raw fruits and vegetables. Additionally, avoid visiting poultry farms or live-animal markets to prevent the contraction and spread of bird flu

 

Keep wild animals wild: While touching, petting, and feeding wild animals is exciting, remember that most wild animals are not comfortable interacting with humans or have been habituated into doing so for food. No matter if they are domestic pets or wild creatures, animal licks, bites, and scratches can lead to bacterial infections. Be aware of animals being used for financial gain and look into the animal welfare of any wildlife related activity. Protect these animals and yourself by keeping wild animals wild!

 

With proper preventative planning, you can count on an enjoyable trip. Create a Runway treatment plan to stay healthy as you explore.

Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
Slide
    Start your online visit

    Runway offers travelers like you, the medications you may need before you go.